Across the board, each member of the ensemble gets inside the skin of their roles and pulls their oars together rhythmically like a championship crew. … Goldman is a hoot as this sassy, sexy mermaid out of water, who parlays her dumb bunny routine into opportunity.
— BroadwayWorld
Andrea Goldman is a standout in the tricky role of Kia, one moment a ditsy girlfriend, another a brazen seductress.
— Jules Becker, The Jewish Advocate
As Kia, Andrea Goldman is quite funny — her Kia is a sexpot stoner who discombobulates each of the Schwartz men in different ways.
— The Boston Globe
Andrea Goldman is fascinating as the model and girlfriend of brother-in-law Gene. Head-to-toe gorgeous, she uses remarkable sinuous body language to display the always burning sexual desire of this character in an expressive performance – sometimes enthusiastic little girl, sometime sleepily sexual.
— Wicked Local Review
Goldman could teach a master class on how to suffer onstage. Her chilling torture scenes stayed with me for hours after the performance.
— Theatre Is Easy, Malefactions Review (http://www.theasy.com/Reviews/2016/M/malefactions.php)
What a delight to work with Andrea! Her subtle and generous work as Calpurnia in Julius Caesar gave depth and shading to the title character. What’s more, she is a ray of sunshine to be around. Come back, soon.
— James Andreassi, Artistic Director of Elm Shakes and Co-Director with Alvin Epstein of JC
Ms. Goldman dominates with her dancing capping a gripping performance as the tortured wife, the play and the poem from which it is derived inspired by her time as a student in Santiago. Her closeness to the material is apparent in her aggressive, focused acting
— East Hampton Star
The play owes a debt to playwrights including Beckett and Pinter, who frequently employed metaphor and ‘economy of language.
— New York Times, on original piece "La Cueca"
Her work is emotionally rich, but not indulgent. Her work never fails to have epic size, but is never over the top or melodramatic.
— Michael Grenham, Stella Adler
Recalling the surrealism and paranoia of the relationships conveyed in the works of the Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier, the piece also evokes Richard Yates and his theme of middle-class ennui — a marriage troubled by infidelity and plagued by infertility but perhaps more important, an unnerving sense of entrapment.
— East Hampton Star on "La Cueca"
Missouri-born Andrea Goldman admirably showed the other side of the social coin, a beautiful woman forced into prostitution to rise out of poverty.
— Somerset Review on "The Rover" at the Bristol Old Vic
From their wounds, we are left feeling the liberation of three strong women in search of themselves and tougher skin, while we (as audience) simultaneously experience a diverse form of art in which innovation goes hand in hand with creative aesthetics.
— ArtiBerlin on original work "Sometimes at Night"
The action of the three (women) is revealed in the ballast that dwells in their souls
— ArtiBerlin